A Clean Kill? Ventilating the Asthmatic Patient

May 03, 2018 00:44:19
A Clean Kill? Ventilating the Asthmatic Patient
Critical Care Perspectives in Emergency Medicine
A Clean Kill? Ventilating the Asthmatic Patient
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Show Notes

Mechanically ventilating the patient with a severe asthma exacerbation is fraught with peril.  Incorrect settings for tidal volume, respiratory rate, pressure triggers, or inspiratory flow can quickly worsen hyperinflation and case hemodynamic collapse.  In this episode we tackle the pitfalls and provide the key pearls you NEED to know!

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