ED Sepsis Screening - Is qSOFA Really Better?

February 05, 2019 00:30:53
ED Sepsis Screening - Is qSOFA Really Better?
Critical Care Perspectives in Emergency Medicine
ED Sepsis Screening - Is qSOFA Really Better?
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Show Notes

As EDs across the country strive to meet sepsis benchmark metrics, many have implemented a variety of screening tools. With the publication of Sepsis-3, qSOFA is the latest screening tool recommended for patients outside of the ICU setting.  In this podcast we review the derivation of qSOFA and discuss recent literature on whether qSOFA is any better than traditional screening tools.

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