Pearls for the Management Heatstroke

July 04, 2018 00:23:41
Pearls for the Management Heatstroke
Critical Care Perspectives in Emergency Medicine
Pearls for the Management Heatstroke
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Show Notes

The heat and humidity have returned to the Northern Hemisphere!  Numerous deaths have already been reported due to the extreme heat.  In this episode we cover the critical interventions you need to know and do to improve the outcomes of patients suffering from heatstroke.

You can get CME credit for this episode here!

Episode Transcript

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